Create EventHub Client as Event Producer .Net

To be able to send events to the EventHub, we need an EventHub Client as part of our Infrastructure layer. This implementation is part of an EventProducer used by an Azure Function. I’m using a .Net 6 Class Library Project to create the Client named MyService.EventHubClient.

Under the Domain Layer, add an Interface to be implemented by the EventHubService.

public interface IHrEventHubService
{
    Task SendToEventHub(EventDataWrapper eventDataWrapper);
   
}

The EventDataWrapper contains the required serialized data to be shared between different services in a Microservice architecture. The data can be serialized/deserialized using Newtonsoft.json approach or Avro Serializer with Schema Registry. The EventDataWrapper is exposing the required properties over the domain models and sending the data to the Event Hub as the Producer.

Back to the EventHubClient Project, create EventHubClientBuilder as below:

public static class EventHubClientBuilder
{
    public static EventHubProducerClient Build(string connectionString, string eventHubName)
    {
        return new EventHubProducerClient(connectionString, eventHubName);
    }
}

The above class is like a Factory to return the EventHubProducerClient object and will be created on Startup.

Now, create the EventHubService that will implement the Interface created in the domain layer above:

public class EventHubService : IHrEventHubService
{
    private readonly EventHubProducerClient _eventHubProducerClient;

    public EventHubService(EventHubProducerClient eventHubProducerClient)
    {
        this._eventHubProducerClient = eventHubProducerClient;
    }

    public async Task SendToEventHub(EventDataWrapper eventDataWrapper)
    {
        using var eventBatch = await _eventHubProducerClient.CreateBatchAsync();
        EventData messageEventData;

        if (eventDataWrapper.SerializerType == SerializationType.Avro)
        {
            messageEventData = eventDataWrapper.AvroSerializedEventData;
            messageEventData?.Properties.Add("ContentType", messageEventData.ContentType);
            messageEventData?.Properties.Add("SerializationType", "Avro");
        }
        else
        {
            messageEventData = new EventData(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(eventDataWrapper.Message));
            messageEventData.Properties.Add("SerializationType", "Other");
        }

        messageEventData?.Properties.Add("EventType", eventDataWrapper.EventType);
        if (!eventBatch.TryAdd(messageEventData))
        {
            throw new Exception($"Event is too large for the batch and cannot be sent.");
        }
        await _eventHubProducerClient.SendAsync(eventBatch);
    }
}

Use the default DI in the Startup.cs class of an Azure Function to get the EventHubService object as below:

public class Startup : FunctionsStartup
{
    public override void Configure(IFunctionsHostBuilder builder)
    {
		//...
		builder.Services.AddSingleton(factory =>
        {
            var eventHubClient = EventHubClientBuilder.Build(appConfiguration.EventProducerEventHubConnectionString,
                appConfiguration.EventProducerEventHub);

            IHrEventHubService hrEventHubClient = new EventHubService(eventHubClient);
            return hrEventHubClient;
        });
		//...
	}	
}

This is just an example of creating the EventHubProducerClient, however you can change the serialization and EventDataWrapper implementation as required.

Modify Block Blob with Pessimistic Concurrency approach Azure

In this example, we’ll take a Block Blob and an example of a class named Assignment. The Pessimistic Concurrency approach takes a Lease on a Blob Client and allows overwrite only if the Lease is not expired else it’ll give HttpStatusCode.PreconditionFailed error. For more details, check the following document.

The code below is a .Net 6 Console App.

The Assignment Class has the following Properties:

public class Assignment
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Code { get; set; }
    public string Kind { get; set; }
    public double pehe { get; set; }
}

The Console App’s Program.cs code will fetch blob content every time and manually add another Assignment. In the 4th step, it’ll fetch content from another Blob and append the Deserialized object to the original list of Assignments being built in previous steps and finally overwrite the first Blob with all Assignments.

using Azure;
using Azure.Storage.Blobs;
using Azure.Storage.Blobs.Models;
using Azure.Storage.Blobs.Specialized;
using Newtonsoft.Json;
using System.Net;
using System.Text;

await PessimisticConcurrencyBlob();

Console.WriteLine("done");
Console.ReadLine();

async Task PessimisticConcurrencyBlob()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Demonstrate pessimistic concurrency");
    string connectionString = "xxxx"; //ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["storage"].Con;
    string filename = "testAssignment.json";
    string containerName = "mycontainer";
    BlobServiceClient _blobServiceClient = new BlobServiceClient(connectionString);
    BlobContainerClient containerClient = _blobServiceClient.GetBlobContainerClient(containerName);


    BlobClient blobClient = containerClient.GetBlobClient(filename);
    BlobLeaseClient blobLeaseClient = blobClient.GetBlobLeaseClient();


    string filename2 = "assignments.json";
    BlobClient blobClient2 = containerClient.GetBlobClient(filename2);

    try
    {
        // Create the container if it does not exist.
        await containerClient.CreateIfNotExistsAsync();
        var blobAssList = await RetrieveBlobContentAsync(blobClient);
        // Upload json to a blob.
        Assignment assignment1 = new Assignment()
        {
            Id = 8,
            Code = "ABC",
            Kind =  "Lead",
            pehe = 10.0
        };
        blobAssList.Add(assignment1);

        var blobContents1 = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(blobAssList);
        byte[] byteArray = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(blobContents1);
        using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(byteArray))
        {
            BlobContentInfo blobContentInfo = await blobClient.UploadAsync(stream, overwrite: true);
        }

        // Acquire a lease on the blob.
        BlobLease blobLease = await blobLeaseClient.AcquireAsync(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(60));
        Console.WriteLine("Blob lease acquired. LeaseId = {0}", blobLease.LeaseId);

        // Set the request condition to include the lease ID.
        BlobUploadOptions blobUploadOptions = new BlobUploadOptions()
        {
            Conditions = new BlobRequestConditions()
            {
                LeaseId = blobLease.LeaseId
            }
        };

        // Write to the blob again, providing the lease ID on the request.
        // The lease ID was provided, so this call should succeed.
        // Upload json to a blob.
        blobAssList = await RetrieveBlobContentAsync(blobClient);
        Assignment assignment2 = new Assignment()
        {
            Id = 9,
            Code = "DEF",
            Kind = "Assignment",
            pehe = 20.0
        };
        blobAssList.Add(assignment2);
        var blobContents2 = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(blobAssList);
        byteArray = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(blobContents2);

        using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(byteArray))
        {
            BlobContentInfo blobContentInfo = await blobClient.UploadAsync(stream, blobUploadOptions);
        }

        // This code simulates an update by another client.
        // The lease ID is not provided, so this call fails.

        // Acquire a lease on the blob.
        BlobLease blobLease2 = await blobLeaseClient.AcquireAsync(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(60));
        Console.WriteLine("Blob lease acquired. LeaseId = {0}", blobLease2.LeaseId);

        // Set the request condition to include the lease ID.
        BlobUploadOptions blobUploadOptions2 = new BlobUploadOptions()
        {
            Conditions = new BlobRequestConditions()
            {
                LeaseId = blobLease2.LeaseId
            }
        };

        blobAssList = await RetrieveBlobContentAsync(blobClient);
        Assignment assignment3 = new Assignment()
        {
            Id = 10,
            Code = "GHI",
            Kind = "Assignment",
            pehe = 30.0
        };
        blobAssList.Add(assignment3);
        var blobContents3 = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(blobAssList);
        byteArray = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(blobContents3);

        using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(byteArray))
        {
            // This call should fail with error code 412 (Precondition Failed).
            BlobContentInfo blobContentInfo = await blobClient.UploadAsync(stream, blobUploadOptions2);
        }

        // Calling another blob and add to first blob.
        BlobLease blobLease3 = await blobLeaseClient.AcquireAsync(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(60));
        Console.WriteLine("Blob lease acquired. LeaseId = {0}", blobLease3.LeaseId);

        // Set the request condition to include the lease ID.
        BlobUploadOptions blobUploadOptions3 = new BlobUploadOptions()
        {
            Conditions = new BlobRequestConditions()
            {
                LeaseId = blobLease3.LeaseId
            }
        };

        var blobAssList2 = await RetrieveBlobContentAsync(blobClient2);
        blobAssList.AddRange(blobAssList2);
        var blobContents4 = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(blobAssList);
        byteArray = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(blobContents4);

        using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(byteArray))
        {
            // This call should fail with error code 412 (Precondition Failed).
            BlobContentInfo blobContentInfo = await blobClient.UploadAsync(stream, blobUploadOptions3);
        }

    }
    catch (RequestFailedException e)
    {
        if (e.Status == (int)HttpStatusCode.PreconditionFailed)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(
                @"Precondition failure as expected. The lease ID was not provided.");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
            throw;
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        await blobLeaseClient.ReleaseAsync();
    }
}

The code for fetching the Blob Content is as follows:

async Task<List<Assignment>> RetrieveBlobContentAsync(BlobClient blobClient)
{
    //List<Assignment> assignments = new List<Assignment>();

    var response = await blobClient.DownloadAsync();
    string content = string.Empty;
    using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(response.Value.Content))
    {
        while (!streamReader.EndOfStream)
        {
            content = await streamReader.ReadToEndAsync();
        }
    }

    var assignments = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<Assignment>>(content);

    return assignments;
}

Append to text file AppendBlock BlobStorage Azure

Below example takes input from user in a .Net 6 Console App and appends each input to a text file on BlobStorage using AppendBlob. The connectionString is a SAS for access to the Blob Storage and should be managed in appSettings.json file.

using Azure.Storage.Blobs;
using Azure.Storage.Blobs.Specialized;
using System.Text;

Console.WriteLine("please enter text to add to the blob: ");
string text = Console.ReadLine();

await AppendContentBlobAsync(text);

Console.WriteLine("done");
Console.ReadLine();


async Task AppendContentBlobAsync(string content)
{
    string connectionString = "xxxx";
    string filename = "test.txt";
    string containerName = "mycontainer";
    BlobServiceClient _blobServiceClient = new BlobServiceClient(connectionString);
    BlobContainerClient container = _blobServiceClient.GetBlobContainerClient(containerName);
    await container.CreateIfNotExistsAsync();
    AppendBlobClient appendBlobClient = container.GetAppendBlobClient(filename);
    if (!await appendBlobClient.ExistsAsync())
    {
        await appendBlobClient.CreateAsync();
    }
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(content)))
    {
        await appendBlobClient.AppendBlockAsync(ms);
    }
}

Entrepreneurs Can Maximize Their Business With These Data Analytics Strategies

Data analytics can tell business owners a lot about their customers, their marketing strategies, and their own products and inventory, but only if they’re used correctly. Having the right analytics tools can go a long way toward helping you map out goals for the coming months or even years, so it’s essential to look for the best possible resources and come up with a plan for integrating them with your daily practices. In the Tech Pit is a great place to start when you’re looking for the latest tech tools; here are a few tips on how to make data analytics a regular part of your operations.

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Boost your efficiency

When it comes to business practices, it’s essential to make sure that everything is running as smoothly as possible. Not only does this prevent mistakes and other issues, but ensuring efficiency will save your business money. Business Process Management can help you automate workflows within sales, accounting, and manufacturing by analyzing how all the moving parts work together in order to streamline them. As with any BPM framework, it’s important to monitor its effectiveness consistently and make changes as needed. Read more about how automation tools work with BPM to get an idea of the processes.

Manage your money

Not only can analytics save your business money by creating efficiency, it can help you manage that money more effectively by giving you insights into your cash flow and other financial data. The right accounting software can even give you detailed information on your inventory, provide invoicing tools, and help you manage profit and loss and balance sheet reports. Learn more about cloud accounting software and how they can help with tasks like figuring out which projects are profitable and which ones may need to be reconsidered.

Plan your marketing budget

Another aspect of your finances that needs to be carefully considered is the marketing budget, which means it’s crucial to figure out where to focus your spending. This can be challenging due to the sheer number of marketing options available, but data analytics can show you whether you’re on the right track. Utilizing different tools for different data can be useful depending on the information you’re looking to access, so think about what your goals are. Do you want to find out how many conversions your website has daily? Which content is getting the most attention? Look for resources that will parse out the most important data for your needs so you don’t have to spend a lot of time going through that information.

Track your customers’ experiences

As with any small business, customers are a priority, so once you know what’s working where your marketing and finances are concerned, it’s a good idea to focus some time on learning more about your customers’ experiences. Tracking their movement across your business–such as where they’re spending the most time, whether they had a negative experience with a customer service representative, or whether they’re moving on to one of your competitors–can help you figure out what your business needs to work on and what you can do to win that customer back should they decide to leave. Not only that, analytics can help you choose the best ways to engage with those customers in order to create a personalized experience.

Utilizing data analytics can be instrumental in helping you maximize your business practices, so think about what your goals are and do some research to find out more about the different tools you can use. With the right resources, you can ensure that your customers, finances, and daily operations are in good shape.

Need to get in touch with the team at In the Tech Pit? Reach out today.

Response Caching in .Net 6

This post explains how to configure Response Caching Middleware in an ASP.NET Core app using .Net 6. The middleware determines when responses are cacheable, stores responses, and serves responses from cache.

Caching response helps improve the performance and response time of Web APIs where it is possible. But it takes some effort to build out a caching infrastructure and manage it. The Response caching middleware which comes out of the box simplifies the implementation significantly. And also it does not require building custom implementation for caching, plus provides clients the option to choose whether to use a cached value or not.

Create a .Net 6 API, and modify the Program.cs file as below:

using Polly;
using Polly.Extensions.Http;

var builder = WebApplication.CreateBuilder(args);
var httpRetryPolicy = Policy.HandleResult<HttpResponseMessage>(r => !r.IsSuccessStatusCode)
    //.CircuitBreakerAsync(2, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(30));
    .WaitAndRetryAsync(3, retryAttempt => TimeSpan.FromSeconds(retryAttempt));

// Add services to the container.

builder.Services.AddControllers();
// Learn more about configuring Swagger/OpenAPI at https://aka.ms/aspnetcore/swashbuckle
builder.Services.AddEndpointsApiExplorer();
builder.Services.AddSwaggerGen();
builder.Services.AddResponseCaching(x => x.MaximumBodySize = 1024);
builder.Services.AddHttpClient("errorApi", c => { c.BaseAddress = new Uri("https://localhost:7250"); });
builder.Services.AddSingleton<IAsyncPolicy<HttpResponseMessage>>(httpRetryPolicy);


var app = builder.Build();

// Configure the HTTP request pipeline.
if (app.Environment.IsDevelopment())
{
    app.UseSwagger();
    app.UseSwaggerUI();
}

app.UseHttpsRedirection();

app.UseAuthorization();

app.MapControllers();

// UseCors must be called before UseResponseCaching
//app.UseCors();

app.UseResponseCaching();

app.Use(async (context, next) =>
{
    context.Response.GetTypedHeaders().CacheControl =
        new Microsoft.Net.Http.Headers.CacheControlHeaderValue()
        {
            Public = true,
            MaxAge = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10)
        };

    context.Response.Headers[Microsoft.Net.Http.Headers.HeaderNames.Vary] = new string[] { "Accept-Encoding" };
    await next();
});

app.Run();

This API adds headers to control caching on subsequent requests:

  • Cache-Control: Caches cacheable responses for up to 10 seconds.
  • Vary: Configures the middleware to serve a cached response only if the Accept-Encoding header of subsequent requests matches that of the original request.

Add a ValuesController.cs and a simple Get endpoint:

[HttpGet]
public int Get()
{
    return DateTime.Now.Second;
}

Run the API and hit the Get endpoint through Postman and add Cache-Control Header with value “public” and you’ll observe the cached response for 10 seconds.

Retry and Circuit Breaker Policy example .Net 6 and Polly

In this example, we’ll implement the Wait and Retry and Circuit Breaker policy using .Net 6 Web API and Polly. For more details on what Circuit Breaker is, refer to the MSDN documentation.

Create a WebAPI with ValuesController in .Net 6 which will always return an Exception in the Get call.

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;

namespace ExternalAPI.Controllers
{
    [ApiController]
    [Route("[controller]")]
    public class ValuesController : ControllerBase
    {

        private readonly ILogger<ValuesController> _logger;

        public ValuesController(ILogger<ValuesController> logger)
        {
            _logger = logger;
        }

        [HttpGet]
        public ActionResult<IEnumerable<string>> Get()
        {
            throw new Exception("Error");
        }

    }
}

Let’s call this ExternalAPI and running on https://localhost:7250/.

Create another .Net 6 WebAPI called CircuitBreaker.Demo and install Polly and Newtonsoft.json Nuget packages.

Configure Polly and HttpClient in Program.cs file as shown below:

using Polly;
using Polly.Extensions.Http;

var builder = WebApplication.CreateBuilder(args);
var httpRetryPolicy = Policy.HandleResult<HttpResponseMessage>(r => !r.IsSuccessStatusCode)
    
    .WaitAndRetryAsync(3, retryAttempt => TimeSpan.FromSeconds(retryAttempt));

// Add services to the container.

builder.Services.AddControllers();
// Learn more about configuring Swagger/OpenAPI at https://aka.ms/aspnetcore/swashbuckle
builder.Services.AddEndpointsApiExplorer();
builder.Services.AddSwaggerGen();
builder.Services.AddHttpClient("errorApi", c => { c.BaseAddress = new Uri("https://localhost:7250"); });
builder.Services.AddSingleton<IAsyncPolicy<HttpResponseMessage>>(httpRetryPolicy);


var app = builder.Build();

// Configure the HTTP request pipeline.
if (app.Environment.IsDevelopment())
{
    app.UseSwagger();
    app.UseSwaggerUI();
}

app.UseHttpsRedirection();

app.UseAuthorization();

app.MapControllers();

app.Run();

Now add the PollyController to call the ExternalAPI using the HttpClient:

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;
using Newtonsoft.Json;
using Polly;

namespace CircuitBreaker.Demo.Controllers
{
    [ApiController]
    [Route("[controller]")]
    public class PollyController : ControllerBase
    {

        private readonly ILogger<PollyController> _logger;
        private readonly IHttpClientFactory _httpClientFactory;
        private readonly IAsyncPolicy<HttpResponseMessage> _policy;

        public PollyController(ILogger<PollyController> logger, IHttpClientFactory httpClientFactory, IAsyncPolicy<HttpResponseMessage> policy)
        {
            _logger = logger;
            _httpClientFactory = httpClientFactory;
            _policy = policy;
        }

        [HttpGet(Name = "GetApiResult")]
        public async Task<ActionResult<IEnumerable<string>>> Get()
        {
            var client = _httpClientFactory.CreateClient("errorApi");
            var response = await _policy.ExecuteAsync(() => client.GetAsync("values"));
            response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();
            return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<string[]>(await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync());
        }

    }
}

When you run both the APIs, the call to External APIs is automatically made using Wait and Retry policy after every retryAttempt number of seconds 3 times. After that, the calls are stopped as the ExternalAPI keeps giving 500 error.

CircuitBreaker example:

Now change the Http Retry Policy line in the Program.cs file to:

var httpRetryPolicy = Policy.HandleResult<HttpResponseMessage>(r => !r.IsSuccessStatusCode)
    .CircuitBreakerAsync(2, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(30));

The above line will open the circuit and will start giving Circuit Open Exception after 2 attempts and keep the circuit Open for 30 seconds, which means you cannot make further calls to the API for that duration. The Exception will now be shown as below:

Outsource Tasks To Improve Small Business Management

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As a small business owner, you likely wear many hats and have little time to spare. But what if there were some tasks you could outsource to free up your time? When they hear the word “outsourcing,” many people’s first thought is that they’re sending work to another country, but it can simply mean hiring someone else to do a task that’s not in your area of expertise. Here are some tech-related tasks to outsource to improve your small business management, presented to you below by In The Tech Pit.

Web Design and Development

If you don’t have the time or expertise to design and develop a website for your small business, consider outsourcing this task. A professional web designer can create a website that looks great and functions well, and they can also help you choose the right hosting plan and domain name.

Most web design and development companies provide app development. Apps are a great way to improve customer service and engagement and promote and sell products. Check out online job boards to find top-tier app development companies that are the right fit for your business.

Social Media Management

Posting on social media is a great way to connect with customers and promote your products or services, but it can be time-consuming. It’s vital to post regularly and interact with customers.

If you don’t have the time to post regularly and interact with your followers, consider outsourcing social media management to someone who does. Many web design companies offer social media management services so that you can take care of two tasks with one vendor.

IT Services

If you’re not a tech expert, chances are you don’t have the time or knowledge to fix technical problems when they arise. It’s vital to have someone on call who can help you troubleshoot and resolve issues quickly.

IT services can be expensive, but they’re worth it if you don’t have the time or expertise to do it yourself. Look for an IT company that offers a flat-rate monthly fee, so you can budget for this expense.

Security

As a small business owner, you likely have sensitive data that you need to protect. Consider outsourcing cybersecurity if you don’t have the time or expertise to keep your data secure. Tech service providers often offer multiple services.

Choose Software To Support Your Tech Needs

Sometimes, you may avoid outsourcing altogether by using software to support your tech needs. For example, if you need help managing your social media accounts, consider using a tool, such as Hootsuite or Sprout Social. These platforms allow you to schedule posts, track analytics, and engage with your followers.

Another option is to use a project management tool, such as Asana or Trello, to keep track of tasks and deadlines. This type of software can be helpful if you have a team working on a project.

Support Your Business by Outsourcing Tech Needs

Outsourcing can be a great way to improve small business management, freeing up your time to focus on other tasks. You can outsource web design and development, social media management, IT services, and cybersecurity with tech-related tasks.

For more tips on tech and operating a successful small business, keep up with the latest news at In The Tech Pit.

How to Execute a Successful Home Business Venture

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Are you faced with the dilemma of moving and starting a job? It’s hard enough to do one, but it can be difficult to manage both. It doesn’t have to be. InTheTechPit presents a guide that discusses the essential tips that will make your life easier.

Get the Best Deal on Your New Home

To start a home-based company, you must first buy the space. But as an entrepreneur, you want to get the best price possible. As you research homes in Sydney, think about how you can get the lowest price. One way is to buy a home as-is. But if you decide to go this route, you’ll want to make sure that you hire a local home inspector to thoroughly examine the property. While there are bound to be things you need to fix up on an as-is purchase, you don’t want to buy something with problems so serious that it causes you financial hardship.

Think About Your Business Formation

In many cases, business formation is a crucial step. Even if your goal is to hire employees or invest outside, it is important to form a company in order for you to limit your personal liability, pay taxes, and ensure that other details are taken care of.

How your business is organized will affect your liability and how taxes are paid. Shares of a corporation can be transferred more easily than LLC membership rights. Established investors prefer the predictable and well-established structure of a corporation.

Filing your own paperwork or using a service to file can help you avoid paying high-priced lawyers. There are different rules for forming corporations in each state. Before you proceed, make sure to check them out.

Essential Tips

When starting a business, it is important to decide whether you want to be an independent contractor or start your own corporation.

If your goal is to have a flexible work schedule and not be required to file taxes every year, then you might prefer to work as an independent contractor.

If you are looking to attract investors, however, shares of corporations can be transferred more easily than LLC membership rights. Established investors prefer the predictable and well-established structure of a corporation.

How your business is structured will affect your liability and how taxes are paid. Before making any decisions, it is a good idea to speak with an accountant or attorney. Instead, save money by hiring an LLC formation company.

More Tips for Success

  • You should research the tax implications of starting a home-based business.
  • Before purchasing a home, establish an LLC.
  • Before you file anything, make sure to check the regulations in your state for corporations.

Market Yourself

Marketing your home-based business in Sydney might feel intimidating, but it’s easy when you know what to do. Be sure to utilize social media, radio ads, billboards, bulletins, and video.

Conclusion

Starting a business and moving at the same time can be challenging, but it can be done. Follow these four steps to make the transition as easy as possible.

1. Invest time and energy into your decision to move to a new home

2. Apply for a business license and register your business name

3. Identify possible office space options near your new home

4. Understand how to set up utilities in your new location

Must-Have Tech Tools for Solopreneurs, Freelancers, and Small Business Owners

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If you’re a solopreneur, freelancer, or small business owner, you may be hesitant to invest in technology, thinking that you’d rather keep your overhead costs low. However, buying the right tech tools can help you save time, stress, and—in the big picture—money at work. This guide explains where it’s worth putting your money.

Tech to Streamline Operations

More efficient business operations mean less waste and greater profits. Here are some technologies to enhance your work processes.

  • Project management tools help everyone in your team stay on top of deadlines. If you’re a solopreneur, they make it easy to track deliverables for clients.
  • Communication tools allow you to keep up with clients and workers alike.
  • API tools with microservice architecture can help your business stay secure and scalable.
  • Automation tools like Zapier and IFTTT help to save valuable hours.

Tools to Improve Your Financials

Maintaining control of money matters is a must for any business. These tools can help.

  • Accounting tools simplify your bookkeeping and tax filing processes.
  • Mobile apps help you manage your business finances when you’re on the go.
  • Cloud storage makes it easy to keep your digital documents organized.
  • The best invoice template makes it fast and easy to get the cash you’re due.

Technology to Keep Customers Happy

Your business relies on happy customers to survive. These tools can help keep them satisfied.

  • A great website manager allows you to maintain your online platform, which customers can consult for basic information.
  • Customer service solutions like Freshdesk and Zendesk allow you to meet customer needs and answer their questions.
  • Payment solutions like Authorize.net and Chargebee allow you to give customers varied payment options, enhancing convenience.
  • Customer feedback tools allow you to pinpoint where you can improve your customer service.

It might seem like investing in technology is a waste of money. After all, it will drive up your overhead costs, cutting into your profits. In fact, these kinds of tools can save you stress, time, and manpower—ultimately saving you money too.

How to create a subdomain?

If you’ve already bought a domain, and don’t want to purchase another for your sub-site, then you can create a sub-domain for your website. It can be a whole different website for which you can give the hyperlink on your main website.

Generally, the domain providers have an option to configure the sub-domain under the domain settings in the cPanel and we need to create A record there.

If you have a VPS or dedicated Server with a Public IP, the configure the IP value of the A record with the Public IP of the Server. So you need to provide following values:

Type: A record

Host: e.g. if your domain is mywebsite.com then put host as blog. So your subsite domain will be blog.mywebsite.com.

Value: Put the Public IP of the VPS or dedicated Server.

TTL: The TTL serves to tell the recursive server or local resolver how long it should keep said record in its cache. Usually, the recommended default is 1 hour but you can change as per your requirement.

Various domain providers like godaddy.com, cloudflare etc. have this kind of interface to point your subdomain to an IP address.